Calculation of a 2 way crossover
Choose Filter:
Application
with resistance divider
This crossover is the most reasonable version since only one component (coil or capacitor) is used per driver. However, the crossover is so shallow that there is an overlap over an extended frequency range. As a result, the tweeter is unnecessarily burdened with low frequencies. On the other hand it's often desirable from a phase response view, to have a 6 dB/octave crossover.
with resistance divider
The 12 dB crossover is the most popular; it's an acceptable compromise between a phase response neutral, but shallow 6 dB crossover and a steeper 18 dB crossover.
with resistance divider
An 18 dB crossover consists of 3 components per driver and is often used as a high-pass filter. E.g. in PA applications for quick detachment of tweeters. It's a protection and a higher volume is possible.
Such a crossover is recommended when a driver needs to be cut-off quickly at a specific frequency. In reality these occasions are rather scarce.

 

Please note:

If you prefer to cut-off two drivers with different filters, e.g. the bass driver with 12dB/octave and the tweeter with 18dB/octave, click here

Professional advice:

Often bass drivers have a much higher efficiency in the midrange than at lower frequencies. To compensate for this, the crossover is often designed with a 2 dB reduced bass driver efficiency. Since then the midrange is too pronounced, the bass driver is going to be cut-off at a lower frequency. In order to keep the values of all other components, the crossover frequency should be halved (e.g. from 2000 Hz to 1000 Hz). The components' values required by the bass driver are then displayed.

Important:

A crossover calculated using this tool doesn't take the drivers' characteristics into consideration. For the design of a high quality hi-fi loudspeaker the crossover needs to be optimised.

Disclaimer:

We strive to offer our free-of-charge tools without any faults. Nevertheless, any warranty is excluded. Suggestions for improvement are gladly accepted.

Copyright © Iris Strassacker 2001. All rights reserved.