Frequency Response Leveller Suppressing of exaggerated frequencies
Please enter decimal separators as "."
Loudspeaker's impedance: Ohm components
Frequency to be suppressed fd: Hz please choose
Required max. damping dmax: dB and level
  Damping in dB (decibel); 6-10 dB is roughly half the volume.
L in mH: 100 Hz 120 Hz 150 Hz 200 Hz 250 Hz 300 Hz
  400 Hz 500 Hz 600 Hz 700 Hz 800 Hz 900 Hz
R in Ohm:
1000 Hz 1200 Hz 1500 Hz 2000 Hz 2500 Hz 3000 Hz
 
C in uF: 4 kHz 5 kHz 6 kHz 7 kHz 8 kHz 9 kHz
  10 kHz 12 kHz 15 kHz 20 kHz 25 kHz 30 kHz
 
Copyright © Iris Strassacker, 2006. All rights reserved - Warranty excluded

If your loudspeaker is somewhat too soft at a specific frequency then you probably will not notice this. On the other hand, if the speaker is too loud at certain frequencies, this is regarded as irritating (everything that stands out or is exaggerated is irritating to the human ear, understatements are usually not noticed).

Therefore we are offering a suppressor circuit calculator removing a rise in the frequency response. In the following the frequencies and their damping in dB is indicated when the RLC crossover component is fitted.

Please enter the loudspeaker impedance (4, 8 or ... Ohm) and the corresponding correction values (frequency fd, damping dmax) and adjust the width of the lowered curve with the buttons resp. .

Please note: the calculated level drop in the frequency response is only correct, if the entered loudspeaker impedance matches the measured value. At the resonance frequency this is surely not the case; here, the level drop is a lot less severe, since the impedance of the speaker is higher.
 

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